Congregation

Battle of Plattsburgh

Lt. Elisha Button and John Taylor were members of the First Baptist Church of Christ of Peru, who served during the War of 1812. Illustration by Lee Hunt.

During the war of 1812 the press-gang seized the teams of John Taylor, Elisha Arnold, Elisha Button, Stephen Keese, John Haff, Jonathan Griffith, Charles Barton, and others, with a special view to the transportation of troops to Sackett's Harbor. 

Nearly every one who could shoulder a musket took part  in the war. Some of those who responded to the requisition made upon the militia by the officer in command at Plattsburgh were David Cochran, captain ; Elisha Button, lieu- tenant; Lucius Elderkin, orderly sergeant; Peter Haff, Abraham Haff, Elvey Ketchum, Isaac Ketchum, Ezra Stewart, Solomon Stewart, Allen Everest, Zelotes Bemas, Brinton Anson, Amos Anson, Jeremiah Hays, Asa Cochran, Nathaniel Cochran, Gardner Button, and others.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; p. 215, Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880., p. 351. www.archive.org

Keeseville/Clintonville Map

The First Baptist Church of Christ of Peru, which became the First Baptist Church of Keeseville, the first church on the West Bank of Lake Champlain drew many people to its prayer meetings.

Kayla Breen/Photograph

Charter Congregation

The Church of 1791. — The church was constituted about 1791, in a log house, then occupied by Uriah Palmer, on the farm now owned by Joshua Reynolds. Its constituent members were Edward Everett and wife, Kinner Newcomb, Robert Cochran, Stephen Reynolds, Lucretia Reynolds, Sarah Palmer, Noble Averill, Polly Averill, John Cochran, Isaac Finch, Abigail Finch, John Finch, Sarah Finch, Simeon Barber, Catherine Barber, and Uriah Palmer, in all 10 males and 7 females, some of whom resided in Plattsburgh and elsewhere. Noble Averill was chosen clerk. At that time, Mr. Brown was the only minister, and this was the only church of any denomination in this region.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; p. 215, Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880. www.archive.org

Capt. Edward Everett & Ruth Rachel (Field) Everett

Prize essay read by Miss Bertha Bentley of Peru, N.U. before the Clinton County Teachers' Association at Plattsburgh on Monday evening May 7, 1888.

About the first of July 1786, a small sailing vessel arrived at the mouth of the Great River Sable. On board this vessel was a family of ten persons who had come from the vicinity of Boston to find them a home in this wilderness. The father of this family was Capt. Edward Everett. He was a tall straight man about forty-five years of age, and had served his country during the Revolutionary War. His wife's name was Rachel. Their oldest son, George was a drummer boy at the Battle of Saratoga. Besides this son, there were seven other children: Edward, Robeort, Susan, Hannah, Ruth, Polly and David Allen. The last was about six weeks old at this time. He was born in what is now the State of Vermont, while the family stopped at the house of a David Allen for whom he was named.

This not the first visit of Capt. Everett to this section of the country, for he being a land surveryor had, the year previous been employed by Zephaniah Platt and his associates to help survey their land. He was promised at this time 150 acres, on condition that he would "improve and settle on this land within one year from the date of the deed and remain with his identical family for a term of six years next to come, unless he and his heirs have leave first obtained from Zephaniah Platt or his heirs under hand and seal, to sell or remove from the same -- the calamities of war only excepted."

Capt. Everett accepted Platt's offer, returned home for his family, and was now on his way to the land which had been promised him. The sloop left them at the mouth of the AuSable River and Capt. Everett with his wife and younger members of his family were rowed up the river to the Basin at the lower end of AuSable Chasm. The elder sons took the team and load of household goods and followed the banks of the river until they came to the same place. Here they joined the rest of the family and they started again, following a line of marked trees for three miles to the westward. This led them to the foot of what is now called Hallock Hill, the place selected for their future home. There was no house, of course, so Capt. Everett and his sons had to commence building one immediately, and in this manner they probably celebrated the Fourth of July which was the tenth anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. Edward Everett's lot comprised that part of Richard P. Keese's present farm which lies east of the "Union," and the whole home farm of Alexander Arthur. The consideration mentioned in his deed was only "ten shillings lawful money of New York." 

His nearest neighbor was John Hay who lived on the lake shore, ten miles away. But very near Edward Everett's south line was a lodge of Indians, who were friendly and gave the settlers no trouble. In order to furnish his table with fish, the girls would go to the Basin below AuSable Chasm, following the same path they travelled when they first came to their new home. Here they could catch salmon and all they could carry.

One of his grandsons now living says he remembers his Aunt Polly say that one time when she went to the Basin to fish, a salmon bit her hook, and it was so large that if her brother who happened to be with her at the time, had not caught hold of her she would have lost the fish pole and all. It is said that Edward Everett once took a half bushel of corn on his back, walked to Plattsburgh to mill, following a line of marked trees, and returned the next day with his grist in the same manner.

Four years after, in the year 1790, under authority of the Commissioner of the State Land Office, Zephaniah Platt and Platt Rogers built a road commencing in Warren Co., and extending through Plattsburgh to Champlain village thus making the route to Plattsburgh easier.  About this time, John Keese, Peter Halleck, Caleb Green and others came to live near Capt. Everett. When in 1792, the Town of Peru was organized he was selected as its first supervisor and he was re-elected to that office three times in the four years from 1793 to 1797. 

The box in which Capt. Everett kept his compass, the original deed, and also the bond from Edward Everett  Jr. to Capt. Edward Everett and his wife are still in possession of one of his grandchildren. From this bond, we find that in 1807, a little over twenty years he came to this country, Capt. Everett, doubtless feeling the infirmities of age, saw fit to resign his property and its cares to his son and namesake, Edward Everett, Jr.

The condition of the bond read as follows: Edward Everett Junior shall well and truly pay or cause to be paid all just and lawful demands that may be brought against Edward Everett or Rachel Everett, his wife of whatsoever name or nature. Secondly, the said Edward Everett Junior shall well and truly provide or cause to be provided for the said Edward Everett and Rachel Everett, his wife in the house that we now live in. Good and serfichent food and rayment together with all the necessaries of life suitable for persons of our age and station in life dewring our success and health, further the said Edward Everett Junior is to provide horses sleigh or wagon convenant for the worship and discipline further the said Edward Everett is to pay or cause to pay one dollar every theree months to the said Edward Everett and Rachel Everett during our natrill lives."

Also "the said Edward Everett and Rachel his wife shall have their choice of any room to live in and free acess of any room to live in and free acess through the whole house and barn. Lastly, the said Edward Everett junior is to give us a decent burial after the manor of Friends."

If Edward Everett, Jr., did not live up to these requirements he must forfeit$1500. The writing of this bond was evidently the old Captain's, and it shows that he was a man of some education though his spelling was not perfect according to modern standard. One of the conditions quoted above shows that Capt. Edward and his wife were regular attendants of the Quaker or Friends meetings and no doubt the horse was used for this purpose every "First and Fifth Day." 

Tradition says Edward Everett, Jr., ran through the property very soon, so it is very likely that Capt. Everett and his wife did not always get their "one dollar every three months." But they certainly had their living from some source and no doubt a decent burial according to the manor of Friends, which did not allow them to have any tombstones.

Capt. Everett's sons and daughters married and went to different parts of the country to live. His descendants are now numbered by the hundreds. He probably died about the year 1815 and must have been at least seventy-five years old for his oldest granddaughter, born in 1811, remembers seeing him but once and then he was an old man, tall but bent and shaking with palsy."

Source: A Collection of Articles, The History of Peru Vol. I" J. Warren Harkness and Others. Eleanor A. Spaulding, Grace E. Arnold, Cora M. Stafford, June 1, 1966.

 

Capt. Edward Everett was born 9 December 1739 in Needham, Norfolk County, Massachusetts to Edward Everett, 25, and Mary Allen, 22.

His siblings were David Everett (1739-1745), Mary Everett (1739-1822), Mercy Everett (1741-1828), Abigail Everett (1742-1777). He served in Col. Timothy Bedel’s Regiment in New Hampshire in 1776. He was Captain of the North West Troops 5 at the siege of Quebec in 1770, and removed to the North West to Clinton County about July 1786.

He lived in the wilderness on the lot S. E. of the corner of Arthur Road and Union Rd. about three miles south of Peru. He married Ruth Rachel Field in 1762, in Milton, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States. They were the parents of at least 5 sons and 6 daughters.

Their children are: George Everett (1763-1813), Susannah Susan Everett (1765-1809, Persis Everett (1767-Deceased), Hannah Everett (1769-1812), Edward Everett III (1770-Deceased), Ruth Everett (1774-Deceased), Mary Polly Everett (1778-1857), Robert Everett (1780-Deceased), Edward Everett (1783-Deceased), David Allen Everett (1786-1861), and Olive Everett (Deceased).

Source: Ancestry.com
 

One of the first settlers of the town was Edward Everett, a relative of the distinguished statesman and orator of the same name. He was a captain in the Revolutionary War, and a son was a drummer at the battle of Saratoga.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880. www.archive.org

In 1786, Edward Everett, a captain in the American Amy against Britain, with his son, George, a drummer boy, came to a site at the mouth of the Ausable River in a sloop. The family, including his wife and eight children, left the sloop. The older boys drove the team and wagon of household goods up stream along the river bank, as the others traveled by rowboat. At the lower end of the chasm they traveled cross country to the 150 acre plot at the base of the north side of Hallock Hill. The land was paid to Captain Everett for surveying work he did earlier for Zephaniah Platt. (Platt was a wealthy man who eventually owned 33,000 acres of land, most being in his greater and lesser locations, both being in Peru.)

Source: History of Peru, New York, Lincoln Sunderland, Major Contributing Author and Editor, Second Edition 2003. Page 15. www.mes-racines.ca

Capt. Edward Everett lived in District 6 on land located at the foot of now Hallock Hill, land now owned by M.S. Keese on what was the old Rogers Road going through the “Union” as far north as the “Stoddard Place.”

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.

On January 9, 1834 Nehemiah Harkness married Deborah, oldest daughter of David Allen Everett, who was the youngest son of Captain Edward Everett of the Revolution. That Capt. Edward was the son of an Edward, who was the son of Deacon John, who was the son of Captain John, the son of Richard Everett who emigrated from England to America about the year 1635. Capt. Edward moved from N.H. to Peru in 1706 and his son David Allen was born in Vermont when the family was on the way to Peru. Capt. Edward Everett and his family were the first settlers of what is now the town of Ausable, and his story is told in considerable detail in the article by Miss Bertha Bentley (later Mrs. T.L. Rogers) entitled "The First Settler of Ausable” in the multigraphed volume. Mrs. Rogers was the granddaughter of Nehemiah Harkness and Deborah Harkness and thus the great-great-granddaughter of Capt. Edward Everett.

Source: A Collection of Articles, A History of Peru, New York, Vol. II, by J. W. Harkness and Others, Second Edition, 2003, “The Harkness Family of Hallock Hill by Dr. Georgia Harkness,” p. 56, www.mes-racines.ca

6 April 1790

At the regular Town Meeting this year the Path Masters chosen were: Charles Platt, Gideon Rugar, John Fontfleyd, Lucius Reynolds, Robert Morris, Moses Soper, Benjamin Mooers, Point-au-Roche’s, John Cochran, South side River, Isaac Finch, Edward Everitt, Sable.

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909. www.archive.org

Edward Everitt, 75 acres on Rogers Road joining George Everitt, One log 1 house,$15, One frame barn, 38 x 20, $800.

Source: A Collection of Articles, A History of Peru, New York, Vol. II, by J. W. Harkness and Others, Second Edition, 2003, p. 33. www.mes-racines.ca

Capt. Everett died in 1815, in Peru, Clinton, New York, United States, at the age of 76, and was buried in Quaker Cemetery, Au Sable, Clinton, New York, United States.

Source: www.nnytombstoneproject.net
 

Stephen & Lucretia Reynolds

Stephen Reynolds (1771-1811) was the son of Lucius Reynolds (3 March 1738- 2 March1815) and Sarah Mary Jones Reynolds (1733-1810). Stephen’s siblings were: Mary Reynolds (1766-1858), Henry Reynolds (1772-1860), Reuben Reynolds (1767-1842) and Benjamin Reynolds (1765-1842). Lucius was born in Greenwich, Fairfield Co., Connecticut, and his parents were Justus Reynolds (1708-1764) and Elizabeth Sackett Reynolds. (1715-1749). In 1787, Lucius mortgaged 100 acres, Lot No. 27. in Plattsburgh.

Source: Ancestry.com

William Williams had a tavern there for a time. Also Tuckerman, Brockway, and Stephen Reynolds, all on one site. The tavern was burned several years ago.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches Of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880. p. 297. www.archive.org
 

6 April 1790

At the regular Town Meeting this year the Path Masters chosen were: Charles Platt, Gideon Rugar, John Fontfleyd, Lucius Reynolds, Robert Morris, Moses Soper, Benjamin Mooers, Point-au-Roche’s John Cochran, South side River, Isaac Finch, Edward Everitt, Sable.

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909. www.archive.org

Lucius and his wife, Sarah Mary Jones Reynolds, and son, Stephen Reynolds are buried in the Baker Burying Ground in West Plattsburgh.

Source: www.nnytombstoneproject.net

Stephen and Lucretia Reynolds. There seems to be no record of this family directly. In later years, a son of Thomas Arthur (1790) married Juliette Reynolds. Mrs. Giles Schermerhorn has said that her father used to say that they were related to Charles Reynolds and Kate Reynolds, who returned to Keeseville from Edmonton, Alberta, “to die in Keeseville.” They were members of the Baptist Church. We believe they are descendants of Stephen and Lucretia Reynolds.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.

 

Uriah & Elizabeth “Betsey (Allen) Palmer

James Uriah Palmer served in the 6th Regiment, Dutchess Co. N.Y. He married Elizabeth “Betsey” Allen.

(1769-6 September 1853), the daughter of Jabez Allen (1739- 1 September 1815) born in Grand Isle, Vermont and the brother of Col. Ethan Allen (10 January 1737-12 February 1789.

They were the sons of Joseph Allen of Deerfield, Massachusetts and Mary Baker of New London, Connecticut. Betsey is buried in the Brookside Baptist Cemetery in Essex, Essex Co. N.Y. Uriah and Betsey’s children are Heman Palmer (1793-1869) and Asa Adgate Palmer (1809-1865).

Source: Ancestry.com

Uriah Palmer, 180 acres on a public road joining Bell's Patent, One log house $40. One log barn 30 x20 $1,200.

Source: A Collection of Articles, A History of Peru, New York, Vol. II, by J. W. Harkness and Others, Second Edition, 2003, “The Harkness Family of Hallock Hill by Dr. Georgia Harkness,” p. 36, www.mes-racines.ca

Uriah Palmer lived in Bell’s patent which is now called Bartonville and at times been called Ferris Mills also Lapham’s Mills. (1958). Page 343, History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, Uriah Palmer is listed in the Census of 1796 as living in District N. 2 (meaning road districts) and having “8” after his name, meaning eight days to work out his road tax, which can also mean about 200 acres of land. Page 346 same history, gives his “Ear Mark” for cattle, “Uriah Palmer’s Mark is a half penny Underside of Each Ear.”

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.

23 March 1802

Uriah Palmer and Waterman Eels, Commissioners of Highways of the Town of Peru, laid out a road described as thus “And a road turned from the George Shavers E., line thence threw the Bald Plane Near Ferris Mills to the Great River* as it is now cut out.”

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909., p. 83. www.archive.org

The Great River* means the Big AuSable, the Little AuSable flows through Peru Village. It was learned sometime later that Ferris Mills was in AuSable Forks. Uriah Palmer and brothers sold their farm in Peru. They went to AuSable Forks and afterwards discovered the old Palmer Hill Iron Mines. The Palmer house was on the site of the present J. J. Rogers home and that point Mallory’s Bush. See “The Forgotten Village” by J. W. Harkness which is on micro-film in the Plattsburgh City Library.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.

6 March 1806

Uriah Palmer was elected deacon of the Baptist Church at Keeseville.

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909, p. 68.  www.archive.org
 

Ear-Marks

It was the custom of the old settlers, in each of the towns, to mark their sheep, hogs, and cattle with certain marks of identification, which for greater security and safety were recorded in the town-book. It operated as a sort of copyright, and great ingenuity was exercised by the settlers in devising new and original marks. The following are samples taken from a large number: John Keeses Mark is a Square Crop off the Left Ear." "Uriah Palmer’s Mark is a half penny Underside of Each Bar." " Cornelius Staats Mark is a Bks in the left Ear."

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches Of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880, p. 346. www.archive.org
 

Sarah Palmer

Sarah Palmer is quite likely the daughter of Uriah Palmer and Betsey Allen, daughter of Jabez Allen with his wife.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.
 

Noble Averill

Noble Averill was chosen Clerk of the First Baptist Church of Christ of Peru.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; p. 215, Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880. www.archive.org
 

A list of the letters remaining in the Post Office of Plattsburgh  Oct. 1, 1814

Nobel Averill

Source: Plattsburgh Republican, Oct. 15, 1814, Page 4. www.nyshistoricnewspapers..org

 

Polly Averill, née Polly Ketchum

Polly Ketchum Averill was the wife of Nathan Averill Jr. and the niece of Madam Delord of the Kent-Delord House fame.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.

10 April 1772

Was born at New Preston, Conn., just over the line from Dutchess County, the home of the Platts, Millers, Newcombs, etc., Nathan Averill, Jr., who came a pioneer to Plattsburgh with his father's family and the Platts; married Polly, eldest daughter of Joseph and Phebe (Moore) Ketchum of Peru and kept the first hotel in Peru, at the Union, then the business and commercial center of the town. To Nathan Averill and his wife were born six sons and three daughters, the four eldest children in Peru.

11 June 1776

In Salisbury, Conn., was born Polly, eldest daughter of Joseph and Phebe Ketchum. Her marriage to Nathan Averill, Jr., another pioneer from Connecticut, resulted in a family of six sons and three daughters. Inheriting the strongest New England traits developed by pioneer life in Champlain Valley, "Aunt Polly" became a marked character. For her, soldiers replaced the planks on the upper bridge over the Saranac as the enemy approached, that she and her children might cross. She was one of the original members of the Keeseville Baptist Church founded in 1791 and, at the time of her death in 1862, lived in the old house under the big willows that was removed to make room for the present Baptist Church of Plattsburgh.

1 April 1798

Henry Ketchum Averill, son of Nathan, Jr. and Polly (Ketchum) Averill, his wife, was born at Peru.

He was among the boys of Aikens Volunteers during the Battle of Plattsburgh 11 September 1814.

16 January 1812

In the east room of the Delord house by the Rev. Frederick Halsey, Maria Ketchum Averill, eldest daughter of Nathan, Jr., and his wife Polly Ketchum Averill and a niece of Madam Delord, and Reuben Hyde Walworth, a young and promising lawyer (afterwards, the last Chancellor of the State) were made man and wife.

20 March 1825 Died: — Judge Henry Delord, aged 61 years. He was a native of Nismes, France, and came from the island of Martinique to Peru where he kept a store and was post-master. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph and Phebe Ketchum, and in 1810, removed to Plattsburgh purchasing from James Kent, the house on Bellevue (Cumberland) Avenue, built by Nathan Averill, Sr., the hospitality of which became proverbial.

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909. www.archive.org

Kinner Newcomb

When Kinner Newcomb was born on 17 August 1756, in Great Nine Partners, Dutchess, New York, United States, his father, Cyrenius Newcomb, was 35 and his mother, Sarah Kinner Smith, was 33. He married Lucretia Banker about 1781, in Great Nine Partners, Dutchess, New York, United States. They were the parents of at least 2 sons (Major Platt Newcomb 1785-1871 and Levi Newcomb 1786-Deceased). He registered for military service in 1835. He died on 6 February 1840, in Plattsburgh, Clinton, New York, United States, at the age of 83, and was buried in Clinton, New York, United States.

Source: Ancestry.com

The Republican Newspaper

The names of the principal movers and stockholders in the enterprise were Peter Sailly (at whose house the meeting was held at which it was determined to proceed with the publication of the paper), Col. Melancton Smith, Judge Kinner Newcomb, Judge Charles Platt, Isaac C. Platt, Caleb Nichols, Dr. John Miller, Thomas Treadwell, Benjamin Mooers, John Dominey, Elius Woodruff, Thomas Miller, Ezra Thurbur, Judge Carew of Chazy, and Judge Hicks of Champlain. The apparent anomaly in the name " Republican" as applied to a Democratic journal is thus tersely and comprehensively explained by Benj. H. Mooers, in a communication to Col. Stone, editor of the Plattsburgh Republican, and published in that paper, July 25, 1857 : " ' Republicans' and ' Federalists' were the party names in that day (1811), and continued so until after the termination of the war of 1812, when the defeated anti-war British party began to steal the appellation ' Republican' to hide their detested name of Federalists, and assumed the title of ' Federal Republicans,' etc.; while the old Republican party took to themselves the prefix of ' Democrat,' and has ever since maintained the cognomen of ' Democratic Republicans.' "

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches Of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880, p. 131. www.archive.org

Kinner Newcomb served in the American Revolution.

A patriot soldier, he enlisted from Nine Partners in June 1776, in the Co. of Capt. Melancton Smith's Rangers, Stephen Haight, Lieut-Col.; rendered nearly five months' service there, and at Verplanks Point, Poughkeepsie, and on the Peekskill Mountains, in apprehending and guarding Tories. In Aug. 1777 he enlisted at Nine Partners in Capt. John Rouse's Co., joined the regiments of Col. Graham in Gen. Glover's brigade at Lansingburgh, marched to Stillwater, encamped on Bemis Heights until 16 Oct., then pursued the retreating army of Gen. Burgoyne, which surrendered on the 19th. Soon afterwards he returned to Albany, then Esopus, a part of the time having only roasted apples for food; was discharged at the end of three months. He was also in the Co. of Capt. Wanderburgh, Second N.Y. Regt.; served in Col. Philip Courtlandt's regiment, a portion of the time as orderly sergt. ; was named Col. Marinus Willett; was a private in the Fifth Regt., Rosecranse Co. Jan 1778 to Jan 1782.

Source: Como Family Genealogy, www.ogdensburg.info

6 February 1840

Death of Hon. Kinner Newcomb at the age of eighty-four. He was born at Nine Partners, Aug. 17, 1756; served with Col. Melancton Smith's Rangers and in other branches of the service until 1782, afterwards drawing 600 acres of land for his services. In Plattsburgh Lot Number 5, containing 81 acres lying west of Catherine Street and adjoining the mill-lot, was given to him and on this he built his house, his son Platt, being the first male child born within the limits of the new town. For many years Kinner Newcomb was a judge of the county courts; twice represented his county in the Legislature and in the War of 1812 was at the head of a company of "Silver Greys" ready to turn out at a moment's warning.

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909. www.archive.org

Kinner Newcomb was born at Nine Partners (Near Poughkeepsie) in 1756. He came to Plattsburgh in 1784. He was among the first ten settlers in the Town of Plattsburgh to receive 1,000 acres of land. He owned land on the east side of Catherine St. In 1786, he was elected assessor, at the second town meeting of Plattsburgh. He died in Plattsburgh in 1840 at the age of eighty-four.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.
 

Robert Cochran

14 June 1815

Catherine Green, widow of Caleb Green, died in Peru. She was a native of Bermuda. They came as early settlers from Nine Partners with their sons Henry, Rodman, John, James, and daughters, Hannah and Mary. The first married Robert Cochran and lived south of Salmon River; the other became the wife of Daniel Jackson, Sr. Their son, Daniel Jackson, Jr., was the author of "Alonzo and Melissa."

Source: Three Centuries in Champlain Valley: A Collection of Historical Facts and Incidents by Mrs. George Fuller, Regent of Saranac Chapter D.A.R. 1909. www.archive.org

The first county officials were as follows: Judge, Charles Platt, appointed 1788; Surrogate, Theodorus Platt, appointed March 7, 1788; Clerk, Melancton L. Woolsey, appointed March 7, 1788; Sheriff", Benjamin Mooers, ap- pointed March 7, 1788; District Attorney, John Palmer, appointed June 11,1818; Treasurer, Benjamin Mooers, appointed March 7, 1788 ; Abraham Bemam, Stephen Taylor, and Zacheus Peaslee were the first deputy sheriffs; John Fontfreyde and John Stewart, the coroners; Peter Sailly, William McAuley, Pliny Moore, and Robert Cochran, first associate justices; Kinner Newcomb, the first deputy clerk; and Charles Platt, Theodorus Platt, William McAuley, Pliny Moore, Murdoch McPherson, William Beaumont, George Tremble, Robert Cochran, and Charles Hay, the first justices of the peace. p. 137 There were only six inhabitants in the town, viz: Robert Cochran and Nathaniel Mallory on the lakeshore, Moses Dickson, Jabez Allen, John and Lott Ellmore, between the two rivers, and Edward Everett and John Stanton at The Union. p.304 Among other early settlers were John Howe, Isaac Finch, Abijah Ketchum, Ezekiel Lockwood, Samuel Jackson, Cyrenus Newcomb, George Hayworth, Benjamin Sherman, and Silas and Robert Cochran.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches Of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co., Philadelphia 1880, p. 343. www.archive.org

Peru Village Cemetery, Clinton County, New York

Robert COCHRAN,/ died Oct. 16, 1821, / Aged 52 years / & 10 months.

Hannah Coochran / wife of / Robert COCHRAN, / died Nov. 2, 1838, / Aged 62 years / & 8 months.

Source: www.nnytombstoneproject.net

Robert Cochran, 136 acres on a public road joining John Cochran Sr. One log house $30, One frame barn 48x32, $1,240.

Source: A Collection of Articles, A History of Peru, New York, Vol. II, by J.W. Harkness and Others, Second Edition, 2003, p. 32 www.mes-racines.ca
 

JOHN COCHRAN

"One of their number, JohnCochran, is commended as an example worthy of imitation for his regularity in attending meeting, having rode to the place of worship every Sabbath, unless prevented by bad weather, until his death, which occurred when he was ninety years old.” p. 304

Edward Everett, John Keese, Peter Hallock, Caleb Green, Daniel Jackson, Gilbert and Gerrit Thew, John Haff," Elisha Arnold, and John Stanton settled near and in the " Union" about the year 1790. John Cochran, George Hayworth, and John Hackstaff settled near the present site of Peru village about the year 1800. Cochran built a grist-mill, and Hayworth and Hackstaff a factory, which soon made Peru village a successful rival to the " Union," and in time the capital of the township. p. 533

John Cochran has the honor of being the founder of the village of Peru, about the year 1795. He built a frame house on the site now occupied by the Heyworth mansion. He was attracted to the place by the fine waterpower on the river opposite his dwelling at that period, forming a strange contrast to the slow, murky stream that can now be seen there.

One peculiarity of the region was the large number of black bears and other wild animals that infested the woods near. " Bear Swamp," lying east by south of the village, embraced at that time a low, swampy, dense forest extending from the river east of the village to that part of the town settled and occupied by Nicholas Barker. The bluff on which Cochran built his house was bounded on the west by a stream with high banks, that came from the south, down which in time came the road leading from the Union to the settlement on the river.

As soon as time and means would allow, Cochran built a grist-mill on the river opposite his dwelling. He also built a log house across the river, very near the store subsequently occupied by Robert M. Day. In this log house lived Thomas Morse, the miller, who for many years was the faithful miller of the place. Two houses and a grist-mill made quite a settlement in those days, and the place soon became known through all the country as Cochran's Mill. It was in reality the greatest public benefaction the town had ever experienced. Previous to this the settlers were compelled to go to Plattsburgh for milling purposes. p. 534

John Cochran, Jr., John Dobbs, Israel Reynolds, and William Pollard lived early about three miles northeast from Peru village. p. 535

The first meetings were held largely in barns, among which were the Nathan Ferriss barn, the John Morhous barn, now on the Widow Irish place, and the barns on the John Cochran and Stephen Brand places. They had a pretty warm religion in those days. As an illustration of some of the hardships that the circuit preachers endured, it is related that in the year 1804 the renowned Dexter Bates, a man of great physical endurance, reached Peru from the south during a great snowstorm, and, finding it impossible to travel on horseback, left his horse at Ferriss', took his saddle-bags on his arm, went on foot all the way to Chateaugay, filled his appointment, and returned. p. 548

The first sawmill and grist-mill was built at Peru village by John Cochran, from whom it passed to John Hackstaff, and thence to the Heyworth family, the present owners. p. 551.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co. Philadelphia, 1880. www.archive.org

John Cochran and Silas Cochran 235 acres on the little river Sable joining Noble Averill* One small framed house, $30. One grist mill, 28 x 26, One saw mill, 45 x 16. $925.

Source: A Collection of Articles, A History of Peru, New York, Vol. II, by J.W. Harkness and Others, Second Edition, 2003, p. 32 www.mes-racines.ca

John Cochran was the first settler along the section of the Little Ausable River where the falls was located. He established there in 1793, and the hamlet was called Cochran's Mills. A village soon rose around the mills, with Hackstaff also owning mills. Some people referred to the community as Hackstaff's Mills. A large soundly built starch factory can still be seen among the buildings of the A. Mason and Sons Lumber Company.

Source: A History of Peru, N.Y. Sunderland, Lincoln. Second Edition, 2003, p. 32. www.mes-racines.ca
 

Capt. Isaac & Abigail Finch

Capt. Isaac Finch was the seventh inhabitant of Peru and the founder of the First Baptist Church of Christ of Peru, which became the First Baptist Church of Keeseville, N.Y. 1788-1968.

Isaac Finch, his wife, Abigail, and their children, John and Sarah constituted the Finch family. William was 12 years old. There must have been an infant of three years, Isaac, born 1783 and died.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.

“In 1787, Mr. Isaac Finch from Washington, Dutchess Co., N.Y., who with his wife was a member of the Baptist Church in Dover, under the pastoral care of Rev. Mr. Gano, visited this region on an exploring expedition. He sailed from Whitehall in a small sloop, and disembarked at Peru Landing, at that time the country was almost unbroken wilderness. Having concluded to settle in this place, Mr. Finch returned in the following year with his family, among whom was his son, William, then a lad of 12 years old. It was a season of great scarcity. Having located on a spot one mile west of Peru Landing, a part which is now used as a burying ground, he immediately commenced holding prayer meetings. He shortly after succeed in inducing the Rev. Solomon Brown, of Granville, Washington Co., to remove to Peru.”

Source: The History of Clinton County Compiled From Data Gathered In 1880: Data on Town of Ausable Continued —- Religious History Covered, Giving Details of Formation of Baptist, Presbyterian, Methodist, Catholic And Episcopal Churches and Dividing of Parishes — Freshet of 1856 Is Described — Many From Town Served in Civil War,” Plattsburgh Daily Press, Monday, February 19, 1934, p. 8.

The most prominent name we find among the early records of the Baptist Cause in this region is that of Isaac Finch, who with the undauntable spirit possessed by the settlers of those early days, pushed his way through from Dutchess Co., traveling now by land and now by water disembarking on the shores of Lake Champlain at a spot now known as Port Jackson (Peru Landing). It then received and remained for many years the name of Peru Landing. Finch was a man of strong convictions and a positive character. Soon after his settlement in the neighborhood, prayer meeting became an established institution and in 1791 or 4 years after his landing on the Lake Shore, a Baptist Church was organized.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru by Author Unknown. Peru Town Historian Office Archives

Isaac Finch, Jun. Acres on the Main Road joining Samuel Jackson, $80, $740.

James Finch (John Taylor owner) 130 acres on the Main Road joining the lake, One frame barn. 42 x 30, $1085. Isaac Finch, 100 acres on the Main Road joining David Weatherwax. One log house $20, $592.

Source: A Collection of Articles, A History of Peru, New York, Vol. II, by J.W. Harkness and Others, Second Edition, 2003, p. 33 www.mes-racines.ca

Benjamin Earls and Benjamin Sherman taught early schools at the Union, where the first school in the town was established. The former was one of the first teachers in the town, and charged a tuition fee of $1.50 a quarter. M. Finch taught the first school in 1790-91.

Source: History of Clinton and Franklin Counties, New York: With Illustrations and Biographical Sketches of Its Prominent Men and Pioneers by Hurd, D. Hamilton (Duane Hamilton) 1n; Lewis, J. W. & Co. Philadelphia, 1880., p. 346. www.archive.org

Simeon &  Catherine Barber

Simeon Barber, son of Simeon and Catherine,  was a clerk in a store owned by Robert Battey in the Union. Battey needed supplies for his store from Canada. In order for one to enter Canada at that time, one had to be inoculated against small-pox.

Simeon Barber was to be sent, so he was vaccinated. As a result of the vaccination, he died April 11, 1811. He was buried in the Blockhouse Cemetery beside the spot where the Old Block House stood, near the graves of Isaac Finch, the first, and Abijah Ketchum. This story comes from an old letter written by J. W. Harness in 1927 to R. Percy Keese.

Source: The History of the Baptist Church of Christ in Old Peru, Bibliography, Addendum to the Church Minutes Transcribed by Eleanor A. Spaulding, Church Historian.
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